Aristotles account of virtue in book

Eudemian Ethicsoften abbreviated as the EE.

Aristotles account of virtue in book

Summary Happiness is the highest good and the end at which all our activities ultimately aim. All our activities aim at some end, though most of these ends are means toward other ends.

For example, we go grocery shopping to buy food, but buying food is itself a means toward the end of eating well and thriftily.

Eating well and thriftily is also not an end in itself but a means to other ends. Only happiness is an end in itself, so it is the ultimate end at which all our activities aim. As such, it is the supreme good. Aristotle defines the supreme good as an activity of the rational soul in accordance with virtue.

Galileo Galilei

Virtue for the Greeks is equivalent to excellence. A man has virtue as a flautist, for instance, if he plays the flute well, since playing the flute is the distinctive activity of a flautist.

A virtuous person is someone who performs the distinctive activity of being human well. Rationality is our distinctive activity, that is, the activity that distinguishes us from plants and animals.

All living things have a nutritive soul, which governs growth and nutrition. Humans and animals are distinct from plants in having a sensitive soul, which governs locomotion and instinct. Humans are distinct above all for having also a rational soul, which governs thought.

Since our rationality is our distinctive activity, its exercise is the supreme good. Aristotle defines moral virtue as a disposition to behave in the right manner and as a mean between extremes of deficiency and excess, which are vices.

We learn moral virtue primarily through habit and practice rather than through reasoning and instruction. Virtue is a matter of having the appropriate attitude toward pain and pleasure. For example, a coward will suffer undue fear in the face of danger, whereas a rash person will not suffer sufficient fear.

Aristotle lists the principle virtues along with their corresponding vices, as represented in the following table.

Galileo Galilei | Calendars

A virtuous person exhibits all of the virtues: Sphere of action or feeling Excess vice.William Blake's The Marriage of Heaven and Hell: There are nine known copies of The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, the third of Blake's illuminated regardbouddhiste.com was probably begun in and completed in (click on the highlighted plate numbers to see the illuminated pages).

Throughout the book, she is sensitive to contemporary moral debates, and indicates the extent to which Aristotle's account of practical reason provides an 5/5(1).

Aristotles account of virtue in book

A summary of Book II in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Nicomachean Ethics and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

Virtue is a disposition, not a feeling or a faculty.

Aristotelian ethics - Wikipedia

Feelings are not the subject of praise or. Disease Control Priorities In Developing Countries: T+ 18 MB: The Model Preacher: Comprised In A Series Of Letters Illustrating The Best Mode Of Preaching The Gos.

Galileo Galilei () Today Galileo is a famous and romantic name. We have all been taught the story of his heroic fight in the name of science against the intractable ignorance of . Oedipus The King Is A Greek Tragedy - Oedipus the King is a Greek tragedy written by Sophocles around five-hundred BC.

The play is set in the royal house of Thebes and is about how King Oedipus, who is portrayed as a reasonable and respected ruler by the citizens of Thebes, is trying to find out the answers to the murder of the previous King, Laius.

SparkNotes: Nicomachean Ethics: Book II